Meet the Winners: Tiny Jane Scholarship

Even after Jane Jacobs’ death, she continues to have an impact on how individuals view the built environment and its impact on communities. The Tiny Jane Project pays respect to her life’s work and presents a fun way to spread preservation/planning awareness. Sixty Tiny Jane dolls were sewn by project founder Sarah Marsom with the assistance of Young Ohio Preservationist board members and sold with 100% of profits being donated to the first Tiny Jane Scholarship.

Representatives from RBCoYP organizations reviewed dozens of scholarship applications and selected five emerging professionals to receive a $200 stipend to assist with registration for PastForward, the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s annual conference.

1.

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Who you are: Jim Gonzalez; Preservation Intern at Toledo Revival. BFA in Fashion Photography from the Academy of Art University. Previously spent two years as the Social Media Coordinator, and served on the Preservation Grants Committee of the Victorian Alliance of San Francisco. 2016 Alum of the Victorian Society in America’s Newport Summer School.

Where you live: Toledo, Ohio as of August 2017. Previously, the San Francisco Bay Area.

Your favorite historic/cultural building or landscape or food or what have you: Though I haven’t visited DC yet, my favorite building is the Eisenhower Executive Office Building. It’s the structure that first introduced me to my favorite architectural style: Second Empire.
Favorite Jane Jacobs quote, picture, or story: “Cities need old buildings so badly it is probably impossible for vigorous streets and districts to grow without them.”
What you look forward to most at the PastForward Conference: It’s a simple answer, but: learning.
Where we can find you on social media: @thecardiganking on Instagram

2.

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Who you are: Amelia Decoster; I received a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology in 2013; and began the Masters of Fine Arts Historic Preservation program in 2014 at the Savannah College of Art and Design in Savannah, Georgia. I am currently finishing my thesis. In October, I will be presenting my thesis as a Student Scholar at the Association for Preservation Technology Conference in Ottawa, Ontario.
Where you live: St. Paul, Minnesota
Favorite historic/cultural building or landscape or food or what have you: I am really interested in opera houses — all kinds! American, European, grand, humble, etc.
Favorite Jane Jacobs quote, picture, or storyWhile you are looking, you might as well also listen, linger and think about what you see.”
What you look forward to most at the PastForward Conference: I look forward to meeting the other young and emerging professionals; I am excited to hear what they are doing and how they are contributing to preservation.
Where we can find you on social media: LinkedIn

3.

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Who are you: Jacqueline Drayer; I am the Outreach and Grants Manager at the DC Preservation League. My work includes just about anything related to preservation advocacy and education, and I have a background in architectural research. I love adaptive use, photographing cities, and eating ramen.
Where you live: I live in Washington, DC. It is a wonderful city for historic preservation because of strong preservation laws and 250 years worth of diverse architecture. Washington is more than the Capitol and neoclassical buildings!
Favorite historic/cultural building or landscape or food or what have you: A few of my favorite structures are St. Paul’s Cathedral in London, River Park Mutual Homes in Washington, and the Moses Bridge in Halsteren, the Netherlands.
Favorite Jane Jacobs quote, picture, or story: My favorite Jane Jacobs photo is this one. The era of protesting preservation issues peaked before my time, so it’s hard not to romanticize it. Her poster is also a perfect universal sentiment.
What you look forward to most at the PastForward Conference: I look forward to learning about how others are encouraging new swaths of their communities to join preservation efforts in creative ways.
Where we can find you on social media: My personal Instagram is @jackie.bird and I manage DCPL’s account: @DCPresLeague.

4.

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Who you are: Kyle Anthony-Petter; I will be a senior at Southeast Missouri State University majoring in Historic Preservation, with a minor in history and architectural design. I grew up in Saint Louis, Missouri.

Favorite historic/cultural building or landscape or food or what have you: My favorite historic landscape is Faust Estate in Saint Louis, which shows early 20th century domestic architecture of agriculture structures.  The structures were built by many prominent architects from the Saint Louis area. I enjoy the landscape surrounding the buildings which forms and unifies the structures with their surroundings.

Favorite Jane Jacobs quote, picture, or story: “Cities are an immense laboratory of trial and error, failure and success, in city building and city design.”

What you look forward to most at the PastForward Conference: What I am looking forward to the most about this conference is meeting others from all over the country.  It will be great to learn more about historic preservation from different people’s perspectives.  I am excited about first PastForward conference.

Where we can find you on social media: I can be found on Instagram @historic_prez and on facebook at Kyle Petter.

 

5.

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Who you are: Tim Wood; I’m a MS student in Historic Preservation with a focus on cultural resource management at the University of Oregon in Portland, Oregon.

Favorite historic/cultural building or landscape or food or what have you: My favorite historic/cultural landscape is the Columbia River Gorge with its many hiking trails, waterfalls, and scenic views.

Favorite Jane Jacobs quote, picture, or story: One of my favorite Jane Jacobs’ quotes is “Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.”

What you look forward to most at the PastForward Conference: I am very excited to attend the PastForward to meet with fellow preservationists and discuss how the field of historic preservation is evolving and what we see on the horizon.

Where we can find you on social media: LinkedIn

Information regarding 2018 scholarship applications will be announced January 2018. For more information visit tiny-jane.com! We would also like to thank Heritage Ohio for being the fiduciary of this passion project.

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Craft Beer Competition: #beersavesplaces

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We all have our favorite craft breweries and at the Rust Belt Takeover in St. Louis on Saturday, May 20, we are going to put them head-to-head.

Here is how it works….

-Bring your favorite local 6-pack or growler to the RBCoYP party!  Your 6-pack is your official entry into the competition, so if you need something to sip on before the competition starts… grab from the share table or bring extra brews.

-The competition begins promptly at 8pm.  Get ready to sample the Rust Belt.

-Enjoy a sample of each beer, cider, or soda brought to the competition. Once you have enjoyed tasting the flavors from around the Rust Belt, you will vote for best label and best taste. Simply put your raffle ticket in the empty cup next to the beer, and consider yourself a part of beer democracy.

-We have something special up our sleeves for the beer winner! So bring your favorite drink and come ready to compete!

Don’t drink beer? Don’t worry!  You can vote for best label!  And if you try to slip a craft soda into the competition, we won’t be mad.  We will be excited to sample one of your state’s delicious products.

*Taste testers will each get a sample of the beverage, not a full can.  Think of this like the biggest beer flight you have ever experienced.

DMS (Downtown Main Street) seeking TLC

Rochester has countless historical gems, from the tree-lined streets of the East Avenue Preservation District and its gracious Edwardian mansions to the hip High Falls Neighborhood that used to house the water-powered industry of Rochester’s Erie Canal trade.  Our downtown main street, though, could use some…a lot…of TLC.  Once home to offices, department stores, and the first urban indoor mall in the United States (how could that go wrong?), Main Street, and particularly East Main Street, is a series of a handful of successful businesses and hopefully successful revitalization projects, neighbored by vacant properties and discount stores.

East Main today
East Main Street today

In an effort to draw attention to the few remaining historical structures left untouched by revitalization along the downtown thoroughfare, the YUPs are planning an advocacy event for early August.  Our event will feature a DJ, local beer, a downtown coloring contest, and a slide show featuring historical photos of East Main Street juxtaposed against other successful main street revitalization projects that featured historic preservation (we’re looking at you, Lynchburg, Virginia and Ferndale, Michigan!)  The slideshow will be projected onto the side of the former Neisner Brothers Department Store, a location that was part of a failed demolition effort to build the new  $230 million “Renaissance Center” that was to contain a performing arts center, an urban campus for our local community college, and a central bus terminal.  This site and a few other buildings once marked for demolition are in the very preliminary stages of rehabilitation projects.

In tandem with the YUPs East Main Street event, the Landmark Society is also hard at work pulling together an application for listing this block and several other adjacent buildings on the State and National Registers of Historic Places.

#loveyourHD : Wright-Dunbar Neighborhood

By: Carolyn Thurman, Young Ohio Preservationists

The YOP is passionate about preserving and celebrating Ohio’s history. Each month, the YOP blog will shine a spotlight on one of Ohio’s many great, historic neighborhoods.

These places matter!

First up: The Wright-Dunbar neighborhood in west Dayton.

From the National Parks Service:

“Best known as the home of Paul Laurence Dunbar and Orville and Wilbur Wright, the Wright-Dunbar Village developed as a Dayton streetcar suburb in the half century following the civil war, and it was annexed to the city of Dayton in 1869. The area includes a residential neighborhood and the Wright Dunbar Business Village, also known as the West Third Street Historic District.

In the late 1890’s, Wright-Dunbar became home to a diverse urban population, including Hungarians, Romanians and Eastern Europeans of the West Side Colony. These workers came to work in Dayton factories and formed a tight community with a host of businesses, churches, and social organizations to meet their needs. Connected to the city by five streetcar lines, it attracted increasing numbers of middle class residents who left the old city center to reside in the new western suburb.

In the years following World War I, the area emerged as the cultural and commercial center of Dayton’s African-American community. African American-owned businesses, such as the Palace Theater, built a strong African-American community. The population shifted in this area in the years after the war and there was a widespread movement of African Americans from the South to the “Industrial North”. Housing segregation also brought many African-American residents to West Dayton.

The destruction of residences and businesses resulting from the construction of Interstate 75 in the early 1960’s and later by U.S. Route 35 had a devastating effect on many neighborhoods but most notably on the West Dayton commercial districts. The face and character of the area changed even more drastically on September 1, 1966, when racial disturbances broke out in the commercial district. This single event further contributed to a pattern of disinvestment in the neighborhood.

Although a large portion of the area was lost in the 1950’s and 1960’s to interstate construction, urban renewal, and civil unrest, the remaining structures in Wright-Dunbar Village are experiencing a period of revitalization.  Innovative housing strategies by the city of Dayton, combined with Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park and the work of Wright-Dunbar, Inc. have assisted in creating a viable urban neighborhood and a resource for Dayton history.

You can learn more about Wright- Dunbar here: http://wright-dunbar.org/

And if you find yourself in the area be sure to check out the Paul Lawrence Dunbar house: https://www.ohiohistory.org/visit/museum-and-site-locator/paul-laurence-dunbar-house

Brews on Tues: West Virginia

By Stephanie WrightWheeling Young Preservationists

I’d be lying if I said that I hadn’t originally intended to use my first submission to Brews on Tues to debunk the whole “West Virginia moonshine” stereotype. Oh yes, we have champion breweries and wineries scattered throughout our hillsides and I can’t wait to tell you about them, but if I were to be honest, truly honest… there is nothing I can think of that better represents the proud heritage of Appalachian libations or long lineage of traditions passed down through generations of hard-working, independent people than the hand crafted spirits created from the grains of our rich earth and mountain springs.

Today I will share three West Virginia distilleries that are crafting artisan spirits the old fashioned way, the way we’ve been doing it in Appalachia since before the Revolutionary war!

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Image source: hestonfarm.com

Pinchgut Hollow Distillery is a family-owned and operated Americana craft distillery located in Fairmont, WV. The dedicated folks at Pinchgut Hollow have painstakingly restored recipes that have been handed down through generations for over 200 years to create an earthy, honest and authentic whiskey. They also offer an extensive line of novelty and moonshine-style whiskeys in a wide variety of flavors all made from local ingredients, including rhubarb, ramps and are the only buckwheat whiskey producer in the country. They have something for all taste palettes, guaranteed to give you an authentic taste of Appalachia.

Bloomery SweetShine  Plantation Distillery sits on a 12-acre parcel in Charles Town, WV, with an restored 1840s log cabin steeped in history.
This charming mini-distillery produces artisan cordials by hand from

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Image source: bloomberysweetshine.com

the farm’s own lemons and raspberries. Yes, lemons in WV! These guys make a limoncello that hands-down rivals any Italian limoncello. In fact, they have over 20 international awards under their belt. But they’re not just about limoncello.

Bloomery Plantation Distillery is the first commercial growers of lemons in the Mid-Atlantic. Along with 40 Italian Santa Theresa Lemon Trees, the Distillery harvests 300 pounds of Hawaiian Ginger and has 2000 Caroline Raspberry plants. Pumpkins, black walnuts and peaches are also purchased from small family farms to create award-winning liqueurs.

 

 

 

At Smooth Ambler, everything is done the old-fashioned way, from grinding their own carefully selected regional grains to labeling and signing each bottle.

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Image source: smoothambler.com

This grain-to-glass craft distillery is bringing spirits alive by pulling the best ingredients from the region with real mountain water and hand selected grain. If you’re ever passing through Greenbrier County, I recommend stopping for a tour and tasting of their hight-quality bourbon, gin and vodka. Every ounce of alcohol that leaves this distillery is hand-crafted and certain to be of the highest quality available.

That wraps up this week’s Brews on Tues! Next time you hear from this Wheeling Young Preservationists it will be to tell you all about whats on tap in Wheeling’s very own micro brewpub (we’re a small town y’all, this is a BIG deal) and some of the awesome local collaborations that are taking place there. For a sneak peek at what I’ll be talking about check out the Wheeling Brewing Company -Cheers!

PROTECTING RESOURCES IN OHIO’S COUNTIES AND TOWNSHIPS

By- Nathan Bevil, Young Ohio Presevationists

While the State of Ohio is known for its industrial heritage the sites associated with that history are quite limited. Beyond our cities and villages are all the farms and cross roads communities that make up the Ohio landscape—the barns, fields, cemeteries, roadside stands, and forests that have been inhabited for over 200 years. And then there are the countless resources we don’t see—the archaeological sites that are hidden beneath the ground that tell the long story of Ohioans that predate European contact. All of these sites and places, above and below ground, make up a large part of the story of Ohio. Yet many of them are in danger.

In the State of Ohio historic preservation is only as strong as your local government. In cities and villages you can create just about any sort of local historic preservation ordinance you want. The same is not true for counties and townships. According to the Ohio Revised Code anything outside of a municipality has limited power, meaning that historic and archaeological resources located in those unincorporated areas are at risk.

The loss of rural resources is especially distressing. As farms are consolidated into larger corporate enterprises the need for individual farmsteads is eliminated. Barns, outbuildings, and even the farmhouse can be demolished to make way for more crops. Small crossroads communities, serving the scattered farms within the township, are decimated—too small to remain a village. Small commercial buildings are left to collapse, citizens driving further and further to big-box retailers and strip malls. The community character is lost to rot.

Archaeological resources are even more threatened. Between oil and gas exploration and ever expanding corporate farming there is little to protect archaeological resources if they are uncovered. There has been limited survey of these sites and this has created large problems.

So, what can be done? How can we save these important resources? It all starts with advocacy. Explaining why these resources matter—and how our elected officials and local township and county trustees can do something about it. First and foremost these trustees can agree that these historic resources, wherever they may be within the jurisdiction, are worth investment in repairs and maintenance. Secondly they can seek out the tools available to them to offer protection from outside forces.

As advocates it is also important to talk with your state legislators. Without additional powers granted in the Ohio Revised Code it is difficult to craft ordinances or resolutions to protect historic and archaeological resources. Be an advocate to your legislators to help protect the rural resources that help define Ohio.

#beersavesplaces – Craft Beer Competition

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One thing is for sure, #beersavesplaces!  We all have our favorite craft breweries and at the RBCoYP Launch Party on Friday, April 8, we are going to put them head-to-head.

Here is how it works….

-Bring your favorite local 6-pack or growler to the RBCoYP party!  Your 6-pack is your official entry into the competition, so if you need something to sip on before the competition starts… grab from the share table or bring extra brews.

-The competition begins promptly at 9pm.  Get ready to sample the Rust Belt.

-Each beer will compete in brackets (NCAA style) against other beers from its respective states.  We will try to match IPA vs IPA, Porter vs Porter, or Cider vs Cider (we can’t let beer have all the fun)…. Until we reach the top beverage of each state.  There is a catch- you cannot be a taste tester* for your state!

-Once the top beverage from each state is selected, the states will compete for the glory of being the best Rust Belt Craft Beer!  The winner will receive more than just glory, but that is a secret for now.

 

Don’t drink beer? Don’t worry!  You can vote for best label!  And if you try to slip a craft soda into the competition, we won’t be mad.  We will be excited to sample one of your state’s delicious products.

*Taste testers will each get a sample of the beverage, not a full can.  Think of this like the biggest beer flight you have ever experienced.